Defense Base Act Compensation Blog

The Modern Day DBA Casualty

US Cracks down on “Contractors” as a Tax Dodge

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on February 17, 2010

KBR, Blackwater, CSA, MPRI, Ronco Consulting and possibly the company you work, worked for have misrepresented their employees as Independent Contractors in order to keep from paying Social Security and Medicare Taxes.  As an American citizen you are responsible for paying these whether the company you work for is offshore or not.  That is not to say all these companies were offshore that did this.

Now these same companies while happily not accepting the responsibilities of employing you for tax purposes were happy to lie and claim you were an employee when they got the DBA insurance they were supposed to get in order to be eligible to take that government contract.

What might happen that is while your injured, not working  and financially getting screwed over by the DBA insurance company AIG or CNA the IRS might come asking you about those taxes you didn’t pay while you were working overseas tax free but still must pay medicare and SS, which would have cost you 15,000 but with the part the company didn’t pay and the fines and late fees they force you to come up  with $60,000.  Try not to bleed on it.

For more on how to determine if  you were an employee or not go here  MisClassifying Employees as Independent Contractors

But trust that if the company paid your air fare, told you where and when to go to work and how to do it using their vehicles and equipment, you were an employee according to the IRS.

From the New York Times

Federal and state officials, many facing record budget deficits, are starting to aggressively pursue companies that try to pass off regular employees as independent contractors.

President Obama’s 2010 budget assumes that the federal crackdown will yield at least $7 billion over 10 years. More than two dozen states also have stepped up enforcement, often by enacting stricter penalties for misclassifying workers.

Many workplace experts say a growing number of companies have maneuvered to cut costs by wrongly classifying regular employees as independent contractors, though they often are given desks, phone lines and assignments just like regular employees. Moreover, the experts say, workers have become more reluctant to challenge such practices, given the tough job market.

Companies that pass off employees as independent contractors avoid paying Social Security, Medicare and unemployment insurance taxes for those workers. Companies do not withhold income taxes from contractors’ paychecks, and several studies have indicated that, on average, misclassified independent workers do not report 30 percent of their income.

One federal study concluded that employers illegally passed off 3.4 million regular workers as contractors, while the Labor Department estimates that up to 30 percent of companies misclassify employees. Ohio’s attorney general estimates that his state has 92,500 misclassified workers, which has cost the state up to $35 million a year in unemployment insurance taxes, up to $103 million in workers’ compensation premiums and up to $223 million in income tax revenue.

“It’s a very significant problem,” said the attorney general, Richard Cordray. “Misclassification is bad for business, government and labor. Law-abiding businesses are in many ways the biggest fans of increased enforcement. Misclassifying can mean a 20 or 30 percent cost difference per worker.”

Employers deny misclassifying workers deliberately. The businesses say the lines are unclear between employee and independent contractor.

Workers are generally considered employees when someone else controls how and when they perform their work. In contrast, independent contractors are generally in business for themselves, obtain customers on their own and control how they perform services.

Many businesses are dismayed about the tougher federal and state scrutiny.

“The goal of raising money is not a proper rationale for reclassifying who falls on what side of the line,” said Randel K. Johnson, senior vice president with the United States Chamber of Commerce. “The laws are unclear in this area, and legitimate clarification is one thing. But if it’s just a way to justify enforcing very unclear laws against employers who can have a legitimate disagreement with the Labor Department or I.R.S., then we’re concerned.”

Among the most often misclassified workers are truck drivers, construction workers, home health aides and high-tech engineers.

Portraying regular workers as contractors allows companies to circumvent minimum wage, overtime and antidiscrimination laws. Workers classified as contractors do not receive unemployment insurance if laid off or workers’ compensation if injured, and they rarely receive the health insurance or other fringe benefits regular employees do.

“This denies many workers their basic rights and protections and means less revenues to the Treasury and a competitive advantage for employers who misclassify,” said Jared Bernstein, who as executive director of Vice President Joseph A. Biden’s Middle Class Task Force has helped orchestrate the administration’s campaign against misclassification. “The last thing you want is to give a competitive advantage to employers who are breaking the rules.”

Organized labor, a strong supporter of Mr. Obama, has long complained about the practice. No administration has undertaken as big a crackdown as Mr. Obama’s, although administration and state officials deny they are doing it as a favor to labor.

California’s attorney general, Jerry Brown, is seeking $4.3 million from a construction firm he accused of misclassifying employees. Last April, he won a $13 million judgment when a court ruled that two companies had misclassified 300 janitors, cheated the state out of payroll taxes and not paid minimum wage and overtime.

Last November, the Illinois Department of Labor imposed $328,500 in penalties on a home improvement company for misclassifying 18 workers, saying it had pressed them to incorporate as separate business entities.

The Obama administration plans to expand investigations by hiring 100 more enforcement personnel. The I.R.S. has begun auditing 6,000 companies to see whether they are in compliance with the law.

One Response to “US Cracks down on “Contractors” as a Tax Dodge”

  1. Superman said

    Superman here..

    Tax Fraud at it’s finest !!!

    You can report your x company by simply filing a

    IRS form SS-8 it is self explanitory and may take up to 12 months for the IRS to approve

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