Defense Base Act Compensation Blog

The Modern Day DBA Casualty

The Good Doctor Prevails for Injured Worker

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on January 4, 2011

A Hand for Dr. Woolley

This is cross posted from Worker’s Comp Insider by Jon Coppelman

For nearly 15 years, beginning in 1990, Bradley Clark was a baggage handler for United Airlines. He started at age 33, and by the time he was unable to perform the work, he was nearly 50. Ten years in, he began experiencing pain in his thumb joints. In 2004 he banged his hand against a cart and was diagnosed with bilateral carpal tunnel, for which he had surgery. Unfortunately, the surgery did not stop the pain. (NOTE to claims adjusters: This is yet another example of unnecessary surgery, based upon the wrong diagnosis.)

With pain continuing after the surgery, Clark sought treatment from a hand specialist. He treated with Dr. Charles T. Woolley, who performed surgical fusions on both thumbs. Coverage of this surgery was denied, as a succession of five physicians concluded that Clark’s problem was osteoarthritis, which is hereditary and unrelated to work. The opinions included an IME performed by two doctors, who concurred with the other doctors that the condition was not work related.

Slam dunk for the employer, right?

Making the Case
In his choice of a hand surgeon, Bradley Clark stumbled upon a stubborn and determined physician, one more than willing to disagree with his colleagues. Dr. Woolley diagnosed bilateral trapeziometacarpal joint arthritis and insisted that it was work related. Among his impressively detailed findings:
– Clark was too young to develop osteoarthritis, as he was only 43 years old when the pain first developed.
– He found no genetic pre-disposition to developing osteoarthritis, as none of the other joints in Clark’s hands, such as his fingers, revealed osteoarthritis. There was no osteoarthritis in any other part of his body.
– Osteoarthritis in the thumbs is typically seen in women, in particular post-menopausal women. Clark rather obviously did not fall within this category.
– Clark performed significant lifting for 16 years, which required repetitive pinching of his thumbs. This kind of grabbing/pinching activity places significant loading on the thumbs and ultimately leads to a wear and tear of the thumb joints. Wear and tear over time led to instability of his joints causing the osteoarthritis. His TMC or thumb joints became unstable over time because of the repetitive grabbing/pinching use. Over time with continued use, his cartilage in his thumbs wore off due to the repetitive friction from the pinching/grabbing.
– Contusions/strains, such as the work injury he sustained in November 2004, also contributed to the osteoarthritis, because they cause damage to the cartilage which leads to instability of the ligament. Jamming one’s thumb also contributes to the development of osteoarthritis because it damages the ligament causing instability and then osteoarthritis.
– The thumb basal joint (where the thumb meets the wrist) is exposed to very high stresses with grabbing activities and the forces felt at the tip of the thumb are multiplied twelve times in their effect on the thumb base, thus predisposing this joint to wear and tear. Clark’s work activities as a ramp serviceman are the exact kind of activities to cause wear and tear to the thumb joint because of the grabbing involved; this wear and tear led directly to the osteoarthritis in his thumbs.

Deep Knowledge
While there were five doctors lined up against him, Woolley was the only hand specialist among them. The duelling docs bolstered their differing cases through articles in medical journals. The Oregon Court of Appeals was faced with a choice: side with the majority or side with the expert.

Ultimately, Dr. Woolley’s opinion prevailed. His compelling testimony, combined with his intimate knowledge of hands, won the day. So let’s have a little hand for Dr. Woolley, who could have taken the easy way out and deferred to his colleagues, but instead fought the good fight for a hard-working man who could no longer do his job.

(For the record, we duly note that Clark retired from his job long before the onerous baggage fees went into effect, at which time many of us lost a bit of sympathy for these harried and ultimately blameless workers.)

Please see the original at Worker’s Comp Insider

One Response to “The Good Doctor Prevails for Injured Worker”

  1. anonymousonpurpose said

    Hello,

    I am going to copy this and send this to my orthopedic surgeon! I have all of the same symptoms, osteoarthritis, but ONLY in ONE joint that needed surgery for years! Thanks AIG! I live in constant pain just from the knee alone!

    anon!

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