Defense Base Act Compensation Blog

The Modern Day DBA Casualty

Posts Tagged ‘Explosive Ordnance Disposal’

Tribute to Troops, SEALS, Navy EOD killed in August 6, 2012 Chopper Crash

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on August 6, 2012

Casualty List

Photos of the Fallen

Posted in Afghanistan, Department of Defense | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

EOD Contractor, US Navy Master Explosive Ordnance Disposal Tech, Noah Sarvis killed in bike crash

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on April 14, 2012

Motorcyclists Question Verdict  April 13, 2012

After the death of Noah Lee Sarvis in September, his family and friends are still seeking justice since the man who committed the crime was only charged with careless driving.

However, the case isn’t as cut and dry as some may assume. Judge Tim Campbell found Felton Bland guilty of careless driving because there wasn’t enough evidence to hold him for any other charges. Some of the family and friends of Sarvis felt that Bland should have been charged with vehicular homicide or DUI manslaughter, but according to the State Attorney’s Office, there wasn’t enough evidence to support the charges

Bland was found guilty of careless driving and fined $1,400. He also will take a victim awareness and driving safety class and his license has been suspended.

FAIR WINDS AND FOLLOWING SEAS SHIPMATE

Noah Lee Sarvis  “Flatliner”

Noah Lee Sarvis, 53, of South Carolina, passed away on Friday, Sept. 16, 2011.

Noah served in the U.S. Navy for 22 years as a Master Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician.

He was a member of the Navy/Marine Corps EOD Association, Patriot Guard Riders, and American Legion Post 392 PC.

Noah loved to ride his motorcycle, enjoyed fishing and being outdoors.

He appreciated meeting people and never met a stranger.

Noah is survived by his wife of 23 years, Liz Sarvis; son, Christopher Maulden (Jennifer); mother, Genette Taylor; brother, Rick Sarvis; sister, Jeanita Vaughan; grandchildren, Madysen and DJ; mother-in-law, Betty Yancey; brothers, Robert Yancey (Crystal) and Victor Yancey (Holly); niece and nephews, Hunter, Addison, and Catherine.

He was preceded in death by his father and brother.

A memorial service was held at 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23, 2011, at the Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel, with Mike (GunnrMike) Fennewald officiating.

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Veterans | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Veteran EOD Brian Sullivan tells his story to President Obama

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on October 21, 2011

What he did not realize is that he had something much worse than a bad leg: post-traumatic stress disorder.

“It was just the way they describe it,” he said of his state after leaving the Army. “Your world is spinning out of control. You’re going out of your mind. And you don’t know why.”`

Foxboro veteran tells his story to President Obama  October 21, 2011

U.S. Army veteran Brian Sullivan has a story to tell, and Wednesday he had the chance to tell it directly to President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama over lunch at a pizzeria in Virginia.

“I was there to advocate for veterans’ benefits and rights,” said the Foxboro native who served two tours in Afghanistan as part of an Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Unit. “I was glad to be able to voice my concerns, and that my voice might be heard for veterans nationwide and worldwide.”

Sullivan, who lives with his wife, Michele, and four children in Virginia and works for defense contractor BAE Systems, was one of four veterans chosen to meet with the Obamas on Wednesday. They got together in a casual setting at Anna’s Pizza and Italian Kitchen in Hampton, Va., after the First Couple spoke on jobs for veterans at nearby Joint Base Langley-Eustis.

“It was totally unexpected,” Sullivan said, adding that there were regular patrons in the restaurant at the time as well. “I was just expecting to meet with some White House staffers for about an hour.”

He was selected by the nonprofit Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America for what he thought would be some sort of roundtable discussion. Instead, he found himself conversing with the President of the United States about his dangerous Army career, his post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and how, after a seven-month struggle, he was able to not only find work to support his family, but eventually landed a job where he can help other Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

“He asked everyone to tell something about themselves but, when he came to me, he said, ‘Brian, I see you were an EOD guy,’” Sullivan recalled, impressed that President Obama knew his name and background as an Army Staff Sergeant who disarmed improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in a warzone.

“I had a compelling job and some true stories to tell about my life,” Sullivan said. “I told my story.”

Please read the entire article here

Posted in PTSD and TBI, Veterans | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Nearly a year after her husband committed suicide, Air Force widow still wonders why

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on September 25, 2011

Melissa hates that a man that heroic is judged by friends, family and strangers. She braces herself for judgment every time she has to tell someone how Jeremy died.

NWF Daily News    September 17, 2011

MARY ESTHER —Jeremy Gibson is a casualty of war, but you won’t find his name on any memorial wall.

On a balmy Monday afternoon last Oct. 11, the Hurlburt Field Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician dialed 911, walked into his backyard and took his life.

“He shot himself in the heart,” said his wife, Melissa.

Jeremy was 31.

In the 11 months since then, Melissa has been forced to cope with blame from others and the guilt she harbors. There were no signs that Jeremy was contemplating suicide, but Melissa says she will play the “what if” game until the day she dies.

Jeremy wasn’t a complicated guy. The native of Chattanooga, Tenn., was incredibly smart, good at math and chemistry and often was misjudged as a “know-it-all.”

He knew a lot about cars and loved racing at amateur tracks. He and Melissa would go on drives in his blue Mini Cooper with no destination in mind. Jeremy always picked the winding roads for “precision driving” (aka speeding).

Melissa said he ate French fries only for the texture in his massive consumption of ketchup.

He was like a kid on Christmas when Melissa returned from the store with Blue Monster energy drinks and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups.

He taped and edited videos for fun and brought his wife a snow globe from every TDY.

Melissa called Jeremy her little James Bond.

His work took him to Peru with President George W. Bush and to Paris with Colin Powell. He covered the Republican National Convention and guarded the Bush family on Thanksgiving Day.

There were missions with explosives so massive that Jeremy did not bother with a bomb suit; it wouldn’t have helped.

Melissa hates that a man that heroic is judged by friends, family and strangers. She braces herself for judgment every time she has to tell someone how Jeremy died

Please read the entire story here

Posted in Department of Defense, Melt Down, Political Watch, PTSD and TBI, Suicide | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Rufford Hobby Hobson, EOD Contractor Obituary

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on January 26, 2011

Farewell Good Friend

Rufford “Hobby” Hobson

Visitation will be in the J.W. Call Funeral Home Chapel at 12 noon on Saturday.

Funeral services will be 1:00 p.m. Saturday, January 29, 2011 in the J.W. Call Funeral Home Chapel.

Burial will follow in the Johnson Memorial Park at Pikeville, Ky.

Military services will be conducted at the gravesite by the Wright Patterson Airforce.

Rufford Butler “Hobby” Hobson, age 79, of Hickory Creek, Texas, passed away, December 19, 2010 in Hickory Creek, Texas.
He was born in Floyd County, Kentucky on October 9, 1931 the son of the late Edgar and Hazel Nunnery Hobson. Along with his parents, he was preceded in death by one brother, William Edgar (Billy) Hobson.
He served in the US Army and then the US Air Force where he retired a CMsgt.

He continued to serve his country in Bomb Disposal until his death.

He served in Korea and Vietnam. He loved his country.

Among his many achievements in the Air Force were, Bronze Star, Air Force Conduct Medal with Six Oakleaf Clusters, Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon, NCO Professional Military Education Ribbon, Army Good Conduct Medal with Three Knots, Korean Service Medal with One Star, Air Forc Longevity Service Ribbon with Six Oakleaf Clusters, National Defense Service Medal with One Star, Vietnam Service Medal with Four Bronze Stars, Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palms, Republic of Vietnam Compaign Medal, United Nations Service Medal, Air Force Presidential Unit Citation, Meritorious Unit Citation, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award, Air Force Commendation Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with One Oakleaf Cluster, Vietnam Honor Medal, Combat Infantry Badge, Master EOD Badge, Master Missile Badge.

He is survived by three daughters, Rhonda Coleman (Ronald) of Tampa, FL, Deborah Bass (Eugene) of Seffner, FL and Belinda Torres (Andres) of Seffner, FL.

Two sisters, Josephine Hall of Pikeville, KY and Gaye Hall of Banner, KY.
Seven Grandchildren, Mark Coleman, Jerry O’Neill, Dale O’Neill, Jennifer Tellez, Gene Bass, Ariel Torres and Yesenia Tores.
Ten Great-Grandchildren, Anthony Coelman, Drew O’Neill, Andrew Coleman, Dustin Coleman, Hayley Farr, Katelyn Farr, Gabriel Tellez, Kaylee O’Neill, Anneliese Tellez and Elaine Torres.
Serving as Pallbearers will, Eugene Bass, Andres Torres, Jerry O’Neill, Dale O’Neill, Gene Bass and Drew O’Neill.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in his memory may be made to the D.A.V. Chapter of Johns Creek, 658 Rock Road, Pikeville, Ky. 41501.

Posted in Civilian Contractors | Tagged: , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Rufford “Hobby Hobson”, EOD Contractor, remains likely found

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on December 22, 2010

Hobby’s Obituary

Update:  The remains have been positively identified and a funeral set for January 29 in Pikesville Kentucky.  The investigation continues.  Will update with further details.

Hobby Hobson went missing under suspicious circumstances not long after his employment was terminated by Ronco Consulting.  More details soon.

Men find bones in Hickory Creek

Debbie Bass was cleaning out a closet Monday morning when she came across an old answering machine. She plugged it in and heard the voice of her father, Rufford Hobson, leaving a cheerful message for her in 2006.

It brought back the love she felt for him and the sadness she felt because he has been missing since April 2007.

“Since my mom died in 2008, I’ve been begging and praying that she would send me a sign of him,” Bass said Monday from her home in Florida. “Not two minutes after I heard his voice on that telephone message, I got the phone call: They think they found his bones.”

Hobson was last seen walking away from a woman’s house in Hickory Creek where he had been living. The woman waited three weeks to report him missing, and police did not consider him a missing person even then. Bass said detectives told her that he had the right to leave without telling anyone and there was no sign that anything had happened to him.

She contacted the Denton County Sheriff’s Office, and her 75-year-old father was listed as a missing person and an investigation begun. Hickory Creek police eventually began investigating but soon closed the case.

Hickory Creek police Sgt. Bobby Starnes confirmed Monday that two men found some bones at about 5 p.m. Sunday in a heavily wooded area off Point Vista Road in Hickory Creek Park. Starnes said that out of respect for the family, he would not discuss whether the bones might be Hobson’s or whether any other evidence was found with the bones. He would not discuss the distance between the house where the 45-year-old woman last saw Hobson and the place where the bones were found.

“We don’t want to make any assumptions, but we’re looking into it,” Starnes said.

Troy Taylor, chief investigator for the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Denton office, said Monday that his office is investigating the death as a homicide until it determines that it is not. He said the bones were in tattered clothing that matches the description of clothing Hobson wore the last time he was seen.

Taylor said one of the leg bones contains a metal pin, which matches information about Hobson. The skull was missing, he said, but a denture plate was found nearby.

“We already have DNA from his daughter, so we hope to be able to get a match and positive identification in five to seven business days,” Taylor said.

Chris Meegan, 26, and a friend were hiking in the park Sunday when they saw the bones. His mother lives nearby, Meegan said, and he has hiked in the park often.

“My friend picked up a bone and said he found a cow leg,” Meegan said. “I said, ‘Dude, that is not a cow leg.’ And he said, ‘yes it is.’ I said, ‘Cows don’t have pins in their legs.’ He was wearing dark pants and boots, there was a backpack and a camo coat or jacket over him. He had a single-shot shotgun with him.”

Meegan said they called 911 and waited for police to arrive. Meanwhile, they called a friend who began to research missing persons websites and found Hobson on a national missing persons list.

They read newspaper stories about Bass’ frustration with Hickory Creek officers’ refusal to investigate the case because they saw no indication that anything was wrong.

“We looked it up on the Internet, and it isn’t even 200 yards from that house,” Meegan said. “It’s got to be him. I hope this gives her some kind of closure.”

Hobson was a career military man who specialized in bomb disposal, his daughter said.

He traveled extensively, and they communicated mostly by e-mail. He had not been getting much work because of his age, Bass said, and he and the woman he was living with were having some difficulties. He had only one kidney and told her the other one was giving him trouble. She thought he was depressed.

He called her April 20, asking for her address, she said. She asked him what he was doing, and he said he was working on a project. The woman he was living with called Bass about an hour later.

“She said she saw him walking away from the house with a backpack an hour earlier and she wanted to know had I heard from him,” Bass said. “I hadn’t, and no one else has since then.”

The woman waited about three weeks, thinking Hobson would come back, before reporting him missing to Hickory Creek police. Officers told her that he did not qualify to be put into the national law enforcement database of missing persons.

A few days after he disappeared, a package arrived in the mail, Bass said. It contained all her father’s military medals and some family pictures. His military pension and a disability check continued to be automatically deposited to his account. The woman he was living with had a debit card and was withdrawing money, Bass said.

Bass could not get the checks stopped because her father was not legally dead, and she could not get him declared legally dead because police would not declare him missing. It was a frustrating time, she said.

Bass said she is confident that the bones are her father’s and she is grateful to everyone who helped.

“This will close it,” she said. “I’ve prayed and prayed.  I’m sad, but I’m happy at the same time.”

Please see the original article here

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, Follow the Money, Misjudgements | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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