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Posts Tagged ‘Private Security Contractor’

Civilian Contractor, Former Navy SEAL Glen Doherty killed in Libya Embassy Attack

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on September 13, 2012

The 42-year-old was part of private security detail and was protecting Ambassador Chris Stevens; also worked against proselytizing by troops

New York Daily News  August 13, 2012

A former Navy SEAL from Massachusetts was identified Thursday as one of the four Americans killed in the attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya on the 11th anniversary of 9/11.

Glen Doherty, 42, of Winchester, Mass., was working a security detail in the volatile nation when he was killed Tuesday, The Boston Globe reported.

“I never thought he’d be another victim of 9/11,” his sister Katie Quigley told the newspaper. Doherty arrived in Libya just six days before his death in Benghazi.

Doherty was protecting Ambassador Chris Stevens and aiding the wounded after the consulate was blasted with rocket propelled grenades during a four-hour firefight, Quigley said.

Stevens and 10-year diplomatic veteran Sean Smith were also killed in the attack. A fourth victim of the attack remains unidentified.

Doherty was a lifelong thrill seeker whose past included stints as a ski instructor and at a flight school.

He spent seven years in the Navy, and belonged to a group that fought against religious proselytizing by U.S. troops.

He left military service to join a company that provides security for U.S. officials overseas, his sister said.

Since going into the security business, Doherty was sent back to Iraq and Afghanistan — and worked in Israel and Kenya, his sister told the Globe.

The family received word of his death on Wednesday afternoon.

igley said she believed the attack was not prompted by an anti-Islamic movie but was premeditated and timed to coincide with Sept. 11.

“Glen was highly trained,” she said. “He was the best of the best. He wouldn’t have gone down for some protest over a movie. This was serious, well-planned, well-executed.”

Please see the original and read more here

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, Defense Base Act | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mark McGowan, Ex Soldier, Private Security Contractor, dies in Afghanistan

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on July 24, 2012

Ex-soldier dies in Afghanistan

Mr McGowan had previously served in the Parachute Regiment.

It is thought he left the Army to become a private security contractor, joining the lucrative “circuit”, as it is known.

The 32-year-old was engaged to be married and had two young children, Manus and Mila.

No details surrounding his death were available last night.

Luke Duffy  June 27, 2012

I regretfully announce the loss of yet another fallen comrade and great friend,

Marc McGowan, sadly passed away yesterday while in Afghanistan.

 

Posted in Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

PTSD Casualty-Hidden war zone scars claim another soldier/civilian contractor’s life

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on June 5, 2012

Another Defense Base Act PTSD failure.

McIntosh took his own life in February in Harlingen, Texas. He was 35

Doug Robinson at Deseret News  June 5, 2012

Dale McIntosh stands with children in Central America. McIntosh did private security work in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Dale McIntosh was no stranger to death. When it wasn’t everywhere around him, it was a constant threat, something that kept him literally looking over his shoulder for months at a time.

A former Marine, he hired himself out as a privately contracted bodyguard in the Middle East, where he lived on the edge and saw and did things so terrible that it haunted him. He survived firefights, ambushes, exploding cars, road mines, snipers and rocket-propelled grenades. In the end, he escaped without any wounds, or at least none we could see.

When he returned, he seemed to be the Dale that his friends remembered — charming, gregarious, warm, outgoing — but inside, he was hurting and disturbed. McIntosh brought demons home with him.

In 2006, I wrote a lengthy profile about McIntosh, then a student at Westminster who took time off from his studies to pursue quick money and an adrenaline fix in Iraq and Afghanistan. This is the postscript: McIntosh took his own life in February in Harlingen, Texas. He was 35

After graduating from Utah State, Dale served five years in the Marines — part of it in special ops — but felt unfulfilled because he never saw action. He compared it to being an athlete who never got in the game. Eager to use his military skills and see action, he signed on to do private security work. At the time, there was a big demand for security firms, the most famous and controversial of which was Blackwater. With a shortage of manpower, the U.S. government hired the firms to protect American interests and personnel in the Middle East. They were largely ungoverned by law, which did not make them popular at home or abroad. McIntosh spent six months in Afghanistan, five months in Iraq, two months in Bosnia and then another two months in Iraq before returning to Utah in the fall of 2005.

Doug Robinson has written at length about his friend Dale.  Please read the entire story here

 

Posted in Afghanistan, AIG and CNA, Blackwater, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, Defense Base Act, Department of Labor, Iraq, LHWCA Longshore Harbor Workers Compesnation Act, PTSD and TBI, Veterans, Xe | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Recognition for Civilians in Afghanistan

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on May 10, 2012

 

However, the first recipient was Nic Crouch, a private security contractor who was killed whilst working in Iraq.

His parents received the medal posthumously on his behalf last month.

The medal means the world to Nic’s parents. Awarded to their son after his death, it is official recognition for his work supporting the mission in Afghanistan. But they have had to fight for that recognition.

The Civilian Service Medal is now awarded to many outside the military who have supported the Afghan campaign. At a lavish ceremony, 110 civilians received their medal, presented by the Foreign Secretary.

 

Posted in Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, Iraq | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

South African, Lodewyk Pietersen, Private Security Trainer, killed in Somalia

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on April 28, 2012

AP at Fox News  April 28, 2012

A South African security trainer was killed by his bodyguard in Somalia’s semiautonomous region of Puntland, officials said Saturday.

Puntland’s government said in a statement Saturday that it had launched an investigation into Friday’s killing. The statement identified the man as Lodewyk Pietersen, and said he worked for Saracen International, a security firm that trains anti-piracy forces in Puntland. The statement said the South African was 55 and married with children.

South African foreign ministry spokesman Clayson Monyela said Saturday no official word has been received from consular staff handling South African interests in Somalia.

“We have not yet been alerted to such an incident,” he said.

The statement said the trainer was killed while accompanying Puntland’s maritime forces on a government-approved mission targeting pirates near Hul-Anod, a coastal area favored by pirates who use it as a base to hijack ships for ransom.

Pietersen was shot dead by his Somali bodyguard after an argument, according to a Puntland official who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to comment on the matter. The official said Puntland’s security forces were hunting for the killer

Please see the original and read more here

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

First new civilian medal presented posthumously to Norfolk suicide bomb victim Nic Crouch

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on March 4, 2012

Norwhich Evening News  March 3, 2012

The first of a new set of civilian medals has been presented posthumously to a Norfolk man who died in a suicude bomb blast

But the small piece of metal carries a huge message of hope and comfort for the family of Nic Crouch.

The Civilian Service Medal recalls his service as a private security worker in the Middle East – and sees the fulfilment of a wish he penned in a poignant letter to his parents in north Norfolk in case he was killed.

After Mr Crouch died, aged just 29, in a suicide car bomb blast in Iraq in July 2010, his family received a letter saying: “If I should be killed in Afghanistan/Iraq and the media is interested, I should like them to know how I and all the other former soldiers contributed to the Great Game.

“I seek no personal glory, but many good Paras and ex-Servicemen have died supporting these operations with little or no recognition of their bravery.”

Now after an 18-month battle by his parents, who have moved from Trimingham to Sheringham since Nic’s death, Mr Crouch has been awarded the first of the newly-created Civilian Service (Afghanistan) Medals.

His father Clive Crouch said: “I am pleased we have managed to get a tick in the box for one of Nic’s requests. The medal is not just for him, but for all his colleagues, particularly those who made the ultimate sacrifice.”

With more and more civilian workers doing support duties for shrinking armed forces it was all the more important to get recognition for their service, which was a far cry from the mercenary “dogs of war” that some people associated with overseas security duties.

What Nic did was “duty in a tough environment” and the MP was pleased the posthumous medal was presented at the Foreign Office this week by Alistair Burt, the foreign secretary for Middle Eastern affairs.

“Bereavement is incredibly difficult particularly when a young man is involved, and when you feel there has not been proper recognition of what your child has done. It hurts profoundly,” said Mr Lamb, who hoped the award would help the family move on.

A Foreign Office spokesman said the Queen approved the introduction of the new medal last June, which would be awarded to UK civilians who, like Mr Crouch, had “served in direct support of Her Majesty’s Government’s objectives in Afghanistan since 2001.

“It recognises their dedicated work in this challenging, often dangerous environment. Their important work is integral to the achievement of a stable and secure Afghanistan,” he added, confirming Mr Crouch was the first recipient

Please see the original and read more here

Posted in Aegis, Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, Defense of Freedom Medal, Iraq | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mark Fisher, Triple Canopy, Never Going Back to Iraq

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on December 31, 2011

The Fiji Times December 31, 2011  See also at MsSparky

MARK Fisher is never going back to Iraq. Eighteen days of mental torture at the hands of the Iraqi military and the real threat of being executed at any time still replays through his mind.

Mr Fisher, who was freed by the Iraqi military after US intervention and flew home on Thursday, said he thought his life was over when soldiers ordered him and his team to kneel facing a wall and to put their hands behind their heads.

“I thought, ‘this is it’. The only thoughts going through my head were non-stop prayers. No amount of money is worth going through what happened to me and my team and no amount of training can ever prepare a person for what we experienced,” he said in the safety of his Votualevu home in Nadi yesterday.

Despite being set free on December 27, after spending Christmas in an Iraqi military cell, Mr Fisher has trouble sleeping.

The former Republic of Fiji Military Forces sergeant began working in 2009 as a contractor with Triple Canopy Incorporated ù a private company contracted by the US State Department to remove military equipment from forward operating bases (FOB) in Iraq after the US military pullout.

“That’s what we were doing when we got detained. We had just cleared a FOB when we were stopped five minutes down the road and taken to a military camp. Our captors said they had to make sure that we had the authority to remove the equipment we had with us,” the 41-year old explained.

“As far as we were concerned, we had the green light and the appropriate clearance to do so but the Iraqis thought otherwise.”

During the ordeal, Mr Fisher and his team of seven men, which included Americans and Iraqi nationals, were ordered to eat food that was thrown on the floor.

“We refused to eat it because the cell was filthy. Instead we ate fruits and bribed some of the soldiers to give us chocolates,” he said.

Although their phones were confiscated, Mr Fisher said a colonel, who was sympathetic towards them after experiencing being detained by Saddam Hussein’s regime, allowed them the use of his telephone to contact friends and relatives.

“The Americans called their embassy but I called my wife, Mariah and informed her of what had happened,” said Mr Fisher.

Mrs Fisher said she grew concerned after not hearing from her husband for a few days.

“We normally communicate via texting and when I hadn’t received anything from him for a few days, I knew something was up. When he called and told me he was detained and no one from Triple Canopy had come to see him and his men, I got really angry,” she said.

When she was finally contacted by Triple Canopy, an official said Mr Fisher and his men had been detained but they were being well looked after and housed in warm quarters.

“We were in a cold cell with no mattresses on the floor and it was winter,” Mr Fisher said.

“There was no heating and no blankets and we had to huddle to keep warm.”

When asked what got him through the 18-day ordeal and mental torture, the father of five said it was God and his family.

“The prayers and my faith plus the thoughts of my wife and five children kept me going, hoping for freedom,” he said.

The Triple Canopy team was released after US Congressman Peter King took up the case.

“If it wasn’t for him, I think we would still be there or worse still, who knows what could have happened to us.

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Contracotrs Detained, Iraq, Political Watch, Triple Canopy | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Civilian Contractor or Mercenary by International Humanitarian Law ?

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on September 19, 2011

Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of International Armed Conflicts (Protocol I), 8 June 1977.

Art 47. Mercenaries

1. A mercenary shall not have the right to be a combatant or a prisoner of war.

2. A mercenary is any person who:

(a) is specially recruited locally or abroad in order to fight in an armed conflict;

(b) does, in fact, take a direct part in the hostilities;

(c) is motivated to take part in the hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain and, in fact, is promised, by or on behalf of a Party to the conflict, material compensation substantially in excess of that promised or paid to combatants of similar ranks and functions in the armed forces of that Party;

(d) is neither a national of a Party to the conflict nor a resident of territory controlled by a Party to the conflict;

(e) is not a member of the armed forces of a Party to the conflict; and

(f) has not been sent by a State which is not a Party to the conflict on official duty as a member of its armed forces

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Mercenary | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Mark Partridge, Contractor, Killed in Iraq

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on June 10, 2011

A FATHER-of-four has been killed in Iraq – the day after he returned to work there.

Driffield Times UK

Mark Partridge was killed on Monday afternoon, the day after arriving in the country for what was only meant to be a two-month posting.

For the past six years the 47-year-old had been employed as a driver for a private security firm, regularly being sent out to work in Afghanistan and Iraq.

He returned to Iraq on Sunday but was tragically killed on Monday afternoon after the vehicle he was travelling in came off the road and crashed.

Mark’s family said details of the crash are sketchy at the moment but the news of his death has come has a huge shock.

Mark’s Son Richard, 23, said: “He was brave and he loved it and he died doing the job that he loved.”

“He was basically a nice guy. Everyone liked him. He was always into his football and everyone got along with him.”

Mark lived in Driffield for more than 25 years after meeting his ex-wife Julie Partridge, 45, in the town.

Julie, of Beverley Road, said: “He was outgoing and liked a good laugh.”

He served in the British Army for more than 15 years, working in close protection security which took him and his family to Northern Ireland, Germany and various locations around the UK.

After leaving the Army, Mark was employed as a civilian driving instructor at the Defence School of Transport in Leconfield, before finding employment with a private security firm.  Please read the entire story here

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, Iraq | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Raymond Allen Davis, CIA Agent, Detained in Pakistan, Former Blackwater Security Contractor

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on February 21, 2011

US reveals that CIA agent Raymond Davis worked for private security firm Xe, formerly known as Blackwater

For background on this ongoing diplomatic standoff and US Coverup read here

The Guardian UK

Pakistani Police escort Raymond Davis

US officials have provided fresh details about at the centre of a diplomatic stand-off in Pakistan, including confirmation that he had worked for the private security contractor Xe, formerly known as Blackwater. They also disclosed for the first time that he had been providing security for a CIA team tracking militants.

Davis was attached to the CIA’s Global Response Staff, whose duties include protecting case officers when they meet with sources. He was familiarising himself with a sensitive area of Lahore on the day he shot dead two Pakistanis.

The New York Times, Washington Post, Associated Press and other media outlets reported for the first time that Davis is a CIA employee. They said they had been aware of his status but kept it under wraps at the request of US officials who said they feared for his safety if involvement with the spy agency was to come out. The officials claimed that he is at risk in the prison in Lahore. The officials released them from their obligation after the Guardian on Sunday reported that Davis was a CIA agent.

Davis shot dead two Pakistanis in Lahore last month who he says he been trying to rob him. A third Pakistani man was killed by a car driven by Americans apparently on their way to rescue Davis.

Confirmation that he worked for Xe could prove even more problematic than working for the CIA, given the extent of hatred towards Blackwater, whose staff have gained a reputation in Pakistan as trigger-happy. For Pakistanis the word “Blackwater” has become a byword for covert American operations targeting the country’s nuclear capability. Newspaper reports have been filled with lurid reports of lawless operatives roaming the country

Read the entire article here

Posted in Blackwater, CIA, Civilian Contractors, Misjudgements, Political Watch | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Karl Bowen, Private Security Contractor, Killed in Iraq

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on September 23, 2010

Wales Online September 23

A VALLEY man has been killed while working for a security firm out in Iraq.

For eight years Karl Bowen, 30, of Abercwmboi, served in 2 Company 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, touring war-torn countries like Bosnia and Iraq.

In 2007 he was discharged from the Army and began working in HR recruitment – but decided that life on ‘civvy street’ was not for him.

Earlier this year he returned to Iraq to work for a close protection unit. He died in a freak road accident in Iraq on September 14.

Tributes have flooded in describing Mr Bowen as a great father, a “legend”, and an outstanding friend and football player who was the life and soul of the party and lived life to the extreme.

A father of two young girls, Elise, 11, and eight-year-old Lois, Mr Bowen had returned to Iraq just days before the car he was driving suffered a double blow out. He was killed instantly in the crash alongside an Iraqi interpreter and an American colleague was critically injured.

His distraught mother Clare Bowen said: “He always said he would not live to see his 31st birthday.

“Karl was never afraid to die, and he lived his life to the full.

“He fitted so much into such a short time – he was very intelligent and an absolute party animal. He had hundreds of friends.

“Life on civvy street was just not for him. He wanted to go back to the Army, but he couldn’t so he decided to take up this job.”

The former Blaengwawr Comprehensive School pupil started his army career with the Welsh Guards in November 1999.

His career took him to Bosnia on a peacekeeping mission in 2002 and again in 2006, and to Iraq in 2004 after qualifying as a sniper.

In 2007 he left the army and worked as a recruitment consultant before joining a private security company, working in Iraq for seven months.

Mr Bowen’s body has been flown to Kuwait while paperwork is completed.

It is expected to be flown to Cardiff later this week so that his family can organise funeral arrangements.

“The last few days have been an absolute mess for us – his younger brother Adam is in bits,” said his mother.

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, Injured Contractors, Iraq, UK Contractor killed | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Matthew Attilai, PSC, Killed by IED in Afghanistan

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on September 9, 2010

A Canadian man with connections to Upper Michigan has been killed in Afghanistan.

MARQUETTE COUNTY —
26-year-old Matthew Attilai was working security for a private contractor when he was killed by an IED.

He was on the Finland Calling program with his grandfather, George Koskimaki, who’s a World War II veteran and author.

Attilai followed in his grandfather’s footsteps by serving in the U.S. Army until 2009.

A memorial service is planned for this weekend at Faith Lutheran Church in Tilden Township.

Posted in Afghanistan, Contractor Casualties and Missing | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

British Security Guard killed in Iraq Attack

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on July 19, 2010

British private security guard killed by a suicide bomber in northern Iraq has been named.

Nicholas Crouch, 29, was escorting US Army engineers to a hospital under construction in the city of Mosul when his convoy came under attack at about 9am on Monday.

The bomber blew up a car packed with explosives, killing Mr Crouch and wounding three of his colleagues and five Iraqi civilians.

The Briton had worked for London-based private security firm Aegis in Iraq since January 2009.

Aegis said in a statement: “Aegis provides security services to a number of clients in Iraq, all of whom are engaged in regenerating the economy and rebuilding the infrastructure.

“At the time of the incident, the Aegis team was escorting project engineers from the US Army Corps of Engineers to a local hospital to review the progress of its construction.”

Sources say that two other western contractors – believed to be Americans – and at least one Iraqi contractor were seriously injured in the attack, while five passers-by suffered moderate wounds. All the contractors worked for the British company Aegis.

Brtion Killed in North Iraq attack

BAGHDAD — A Briton was killed in an attack on a private security firm’s convoy in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul on Monday, British government officials said.

“One British national was killed today during an attack against a convoy in east Mosul,” British embassy spokeswoman Sophie Farrell told AFP, without identifying the victim. Farrell said no other Briton was hurt.

The Foreign Office confirmed the death, saying the attack was on a private security convoy.

“A British national was killed in an attack on a British private security company convoy in Mosul this morning. We have offered consular assistance,” a Foreign Office spokesman said.

There was no immediate confirmation from the Iraqi side.

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, Iraq | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Shaun Sexton, UK Security Guard, Killed in Afghanistan Attack

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on July 5, 2010

A UK private security guard killed in a suicide attack in northern Afghanistan on Friday was a former British soldier.

Shaun Sexton, 29, from Ashington, Northumberland, died in an attack on offices of US consultancy Development Alternatives Inc (DAI) in Kunduz.

Mr Sexton’s employer, Edinburgh International (EI), said Mr Sexton had served as a platoon sergeant in 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment.

Three other security guards were killed in the assault.

All four men – Mr Sexton, two Afghans and a German – worked for DAI’s security sub-contractor EI.

A second Briton was seriously injured in the attack.

‘Heroes’

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the pre-dawn raid, which began at about 0330 local time on Friday when a suicide bomber blew up a car outside DAI’s compound in Kunduz.

At least five other militants wearing explosives vests ran inside the building and started a fierce gun battle that lasted several hours before they were killed.

The men who died were hailed as heroes for their attempts to defend the compound.

Washington DC-based DAI is contracted by the US Agency for International Development to improve governance and community development in Kunduz, which is largely patrolled by German troops.  Original Story here

Posted in Afghanistan, CIA, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing, State Department | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments »

Middletown Grad Killed in Afghanistan

Posted by defensebaseactcomp on May 11, 2010

Ryan Lozier died ‘doing what he loved’

Dayton Daily News

MIDDLETOWN — Two days before Mother’s Day, Viki Lozier was notified that her oldest son, Ryan Lozier, 30, a 1998 Middletown High School graduate, was killed by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan while working for Global Security Solutions, a private security company.

Viki Lozier said her son served eight years in the Army Ranger Battalion in Afghanistan and Iraq. He worked for a year in the private sector, then joined the security company.

“He told me, ‘Mom, this is what I’m meant to do. I want to save people and this is what I love,’ ” she said Monday, May 10.

“As a mother, I have to honor that. I can’t be mad. There is nobody to blame. That’s how he lived. He died doing what he loved.”

She described her son as “big, bold and bright,” and he didn’t do anything “half-measured, even when he was getting in trouble.”

Lozier, a standout athlete, played football at Madison High School, then transferred to Middletown High School for his junior and senior years.

Chip Otten, then coach of the Middies, said Lozier was an outstanding running back for the Mohawks, but, because the Middie backfield was crowded, he was moved to defensive end.

Lozier earned the nickname “razor” because he was always on the edge, Otten said from Coldwater, where he’s head football coach.

“He was a fun guy to be around, but you were always asking yourself, ‘What’s Ryan up to?’” he said.

Otten said enlisting in the military was the “best thing to happen” to Lozier.

Brother Benjamin Lozier, 29, a 1999 Middletown High School graduate, described Ryan on Monday as “my best friend, my mentor.”

Then he got quiet.

“He was everything to me,” he said. “Nothing ever will be the same now.”

Ryan Lozier, who was divorced, was set to marry Gwen Clymo, 23, in June, his mother said. He has a daughter, Izabella, who is 8 months old.

His father, Phillip, lives in Indiana.

Lozier’s body was flown from Afghanistan to Dover, Del., his brother said. His body will return to Middletown this week, then be buried at Woodside Cemetery, the family said. Funeral arrangements are pending.

Share you condolences for Ryan here

Posted in Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties and Missing | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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